CDC Updates Quarantine Recommendations

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released two options for shortened quarantine time-periods in certain circumstances.  For those with a close contact exposure to someone with COVID-19 or anyone experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine is recommended to limit opportunities for virus transmission and protect others in our community.  The CDC still endorses a 14-day quarantine as the safest and most effective way to prevent virus transmission.  The goal of issuing this additional guidance by the CDC is to increase quarantine compliance and reduce stress on our public health systems and communities.

The two “acceptable alternatives” to the 14 day period are either:

(a)   7 days for people without symptoms and who have received a negative test taken no sooner than 5 days of being exposed; or

(b)   10 days for people without symptoms who have not been tested.

Under either alternative, people should continue to self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and wear an appropriate mask through day 14.

Further Reading:

The CDC has a summary of when to quarantine and options to reduce quarantine HERE and a more detailed analysis HERE.

The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) updated its quarantine directives to match the CDC guidance HERE.

However, the Douglas County, NE Health Department’s “What to Do If You Have Been Exposed” quarantine guidance HERE and Workplace Contract Tracing guidance HERE have not yet been updated.

 

A printable version of this information can be found by clicking HERE.

 

Author: Mark Brasee & Sally McGill

Mark L. Brasee

Mark L. Brasee

Partner

(402) 978-5306
mbrasee@fraserstryker.com
Sarah L. (Sally) McGill

Sarah L. (Sally) McGill

Partner

(402) 978-5277
smcgill@fraserstryker.com

This article has been prepared for general information purposes and (1) does not create or constitute an attorney-client relationship, (2) is not intended as a solicitation, (3) is not intended to convey or constitute legal advice, and (4) is not a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a qualified attorney. Always seek professional counsel prior to taking action.